Political Podcasts

Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration’s past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

A political podcast for people not yet ready to give up or go insane.

A no-bullshit conversation about politics hosted by Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, Dan Pfeiffer and Tommy Vietor that breaks down the week’s news and helps people figure out what matters and how to help.

The NPR Politics Podcast is where NPR’s political reporters talk to you like they talk to each other. With weekly roundups and quick takes on news of the day, you don’t have to keep up with politics to know what’s happening. You just have to keep up with us.

NPR’s Up First is the news you need to start your day. The biggest stories and ideas — from politics to pop culture — in 10 minutes. Hosted by Rachel Martin, David Greene and Steve Inskeep, with reporting and analysis from NPR News. Available weekdays by 6 a.m. ET.

Join Preet Bharara, former U.S. Attorney who fought corruption, financial fraud and violent crime, in a series about justice and fairness. Preet Bharara’s moral compass, his deep working knowledge of the legal and political systems, his subtle sense of humor, his calm demeanor, his oratory skills and his ability to attract such diverse and fascinating guests as Adam Schiff, Bill Browder, Ronan Farrow and Bassem Youssef make this podcast a great addition to you audio library.

From the producers of What’s With Washington, 51st is a series about Washingtonians’ fight for representation. D.C.’s 700,000 residents don’t get to elect a voting representative to Congress, and the federal government can block their laws. 51st will trace how racism, party politics, and even an attempted mutiny in Pennsylvania have stood in the way of the city’s path to full representation. We’ll also try to figure out if D.C. has a real shot at achieving statehood today. Could D.C. ever be the 51st state?