More Candidates on Immigration

The Immigration Team sent questionnaires to candidates for Maryland Governor, Maryland Attorney General, Howard County Executive, the U.S. Senate, and the U.S. House of Representatives. Here are the responses we have received.

Calvin Ball – Democrat, running for Howard County Executive

QUESTION:  Three Maryland counties have entered into 287(g) agreements with ICE. These agreements deputize local law enforcement officers to perform the functions of federal immigration agents. Do you favor or oppose this level of cooperation between Howard County and ICE?

BALL: I oppose entering into 287(g) agreements with ICE. Howard County is a place where all should feel welcome to make their best lives for themselves. As your next County Executive, I will foster an environment where all of our neighbors have what’s needed to make that happen. Our local tax dollars should be for our local services and not to be used to enforce a immigration federal policy. At a time when the President of the United States continues to divide us through his anti-immigration rhetoric and is not being fiscally responsible with our taxpayer dollars, leading to cuts of important things like education, the arts, and the environment, we should not be taking local dollars to use for immigration enforcement. We need more money for education, to grow the economy, improve our environment, and invest in our infrastructure. We should continue to use local taxpayer dollars to focus on local issues, not federal. 

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Brian Frosh – Democrat, running for Attorney General

QUESTION: The Maryland legislature has given the Attorney General the power, independent of the Governor, to bring suits against the federal government. Is this a wise policy? Do favor this level of independence for the Attorney General?

FROSH: When the Trump Administration issued their travel ban, I asked the legislature for the authority to sue the federal government in an effort to protect the livelihood of thousands of Marylanders across our state. This power is necessary to fully protect the constitutional rights of all of our residents and our state institutions. The federal government created a policy that would harm Maryland medical institutions’ recruiting efforts, diminish tax revenue from tourism and other travel, cause irreparable harm to religious freedom and undermine Maryland’s ability to enforce its own anti-discrimination laws. The Trump Administration has demonstrated its propensity to target vulnerable communities, and this level of independent power allows states to hold the federal government accountable for its wrongdoing.

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Craig Wolf – Republican, running for Attorney General

QUESTION: The Maryland legislature has given the Attorney General the power, independent of            the Governor, to bring suits against the federal government. Is this a wise policy? Do you favor this level of independence for the Attorney General?

WOLF: I believe the Attorney General should be independent from the Governor but should also partner with him whenever possible, and appropriate.  That power, however, should not be used to settle political or policy disputes as it is currently being utilized.

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Arvin Vohra – Libertarian, running for U.S. Senate 

QUESTION: Several bills to abolish the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) unit have been introduced in Congress.  Do you favor abolishing ICE?

VOHRA I would abolish most federal departments and abolish the income tax. My approach to immigration: open borders, zero welfare. No food stamps, no medicaid, no public schools. Ending the welfare state will keep out parasitic immigrants who seek only welfare, while welcoming entrepreneurs, skilled workers, and job creators.

QUESTION: Some in Congress have spoken of the need for “a grand bargain” to settle issues of U.S. immigration policy for the future. Among the issues are the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the USA, the criteria for the country’s legal immigration system, and border security.   What is your view of an appropriate compromise on immigration issues?

VOHRA: End the welfare state, open the borders. I support ending food stamps, public schools, medicaid, and all other forms of welfare. Ending the welfare state will keep out parasitic immigrants, while welcoming hard workers and job creators.

Richmond Davis – Republican, running in the  Maryland 7th Congressional District

QUESTION: Several bills to abolish the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) unit have been introduced in Congress.  Do you favor abolishing ICE?

DAVIS: No.  Immigration control is a highly appropriate national government function.

QUESTION: Some in Congress have spoken of the need for “a grand bargain” to settle issues of U.S. immigration policy for the future. Among the issues are the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the USA, the criteria for the country’s legal immigration system, and border security.   What is your view of an appropriate compromise on immigration issues?

DAVIS: Illegal immigration should be discouraged.  Those already in the country illegally who are otherwise law abiding can “earn” a green card leading, perhaps, to citizenship by serving America in a  substantial way, by joining the military, for instance.

David Griggs – Libertarian, running in the Maryland 7th Congressional District

QUESTION: Several bills to abolish the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) unit have been introduced in Congress.  Do you favor abolishing ICE?

GRIGGS: I am not in favor of a specialized federal agency purely to try to enforce unenforceable immigration laws.  There may be some argument made that some federal agency needs to enforce our laws if an illegal immigrant is thought to be a criminal.

QUESTION: Some in Congress have spoken of the need for “a grand bargain” to settle issues of U.S. immigration policy for the future. Among the issues are the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the USA, the criteria for the country’s legal immigration system, and border security.   What is your view of an appropriate compromise on immigration issues?

GRIGGS: My position is that the 11 million undocumented immigrants should be granted green cards unless they are guilty of a felony or multiple serious misdemeanors. No need for a wall as proposed by the President.  We should increase legal immigration and basically only disallow immigration to criminals, people who are ill, and known members of terrorist organizations.